Make It Mini: Convert Your Favorite Pie Recipe to Individual Pies

convert pie recipe to individual pies

Pie is great. I love almost everything about pie—the versatility, the relative ease, the not-being-cake. The only thing I don’t like about pie is serving it. That fateful moment where everyone watches you make a mess of your once-pristine dessert. That first slice is always a minor travesty. No amount of whipped cream can cover up those mistakes… But, I’m here to tell you that first-slice-syndrome can be a thing of the past—with individual or mini pies!

You can convert any of your favorite pie recipes to make individually-portioned or smaller pies. We’re not talking about those teeny-tiny muffin tin pies. No, these are pies that will make your feel like a giant. Maybe you should even use a tiny fork—that’s up to you.

convert pie recipe to individual pies
Individual Salted Caramel Apple Pies

The following suggestions are based on a standard 9-inch pie recipe. Adjust accordingly!

The Filling

A 9-inch pie recipe will yield between four and six individual 5-inch pies or two 7-inch pies. Be careful not to overfill your pie tins as these are typically much more shallow than a standard 9-inch pan.

This is the maximum amount of filling in cups for each pie tin:

  • 9 inch pie = 4 cups filling
  • 7 inch pie = 2 cups filling
  • 5 inch pie = 3/4 cups filling

If you have a pie tin that is a different size than the ones listed above, you can test the capacity of your tin by pouring water in it until it reaches the brim of the tin.

7" pies convert 9" pies

The Crust

For 5-inch pies:

A single dough pie crust will yield about four individual 5-inch pies. To help with the baking time, you will want to roll out the dough thinner than you do for a 9-inch pie, to about a 16 inch square. This will give you four 8 inch squares to work with (you need the dough to overhang by about 1/2″ if you’ll be crimping or adding any lattice).You can either work the squares into the pie tins and trim the excess, or use an 8-inch circle guide to cut them before putting them in the tins. If you’re adding lattice, make sure to save those scraps from the first crust. Individual pies tend to require more dough than a standard pie.

A crumb crust recipe will yield between 4 and 6 individual 5-inch pies. This will all depend on how thick you want to make your crumb crust. Many crumb crust recipes will call for 2 1/2 cups of whichever cookie or cracker you are using, so you can add 1/2 cup of crumb to each tin to get even crusts.

For 7-inch pies:

This one is a lot simpler. A double crust recipe of pie dough will yield enough dough for three 7-inch pies. The same goes for a crumb crust.

Convert 9" pie to 7" pies
3 pie crusts from 1 double crust recipe

Baking

Bake the individual pies at the temperature your original recipe calls for. Follow the recipe’s directions for oven placement, too.

The baking time is where the experimentation happens. The ratio of individual pie baking time to 9-inch pie baking time has varied for each type of pie I’ve made. If you’re worried about over-baking, start checking around half of the original recipe’s baking time. Generally, the baking time for 5-inch individual pies has been about 3/5 the original baking time. For 7-inch pies, it will be closer to 4/5 the original time.

convert pie recipe to individual pies
Individual Mixed Berry Crumble Pies

Resources

You’re totally convinced to make individual pies now, right?

For 5″ pie pans, you can go with either disposable aluminum or tin.

For 7″ pie pans, these disposable aluminum ones worked great.

Both will produce great results. Happy baking!

3 thoughts on “Make It Mini: Convert Your Favorite Pie Recipe to Individual Pies

  1. Thank you for sharing this! I’ve had a set of 5” pie tins for a few years, and have been too intimidated to try them 😂 I’m gonna get them out today and give it a go!

    Like

    1. So glad I could help – hope they turn out beautifully! I’m working on one for different cake pan sizes right now after buying a set of 6″ pans 😅

      Like

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